I just watched a video of a baby goat dancing, and the video ended with the quote:

"If we could live happy and healthy lives without hurting others…why wouldn’t we?"

And this was meant to be inspiring and uplifting, of course, but upon reflection, this quote has got to be one of the more depressing things I’ve heard in a while. 

bushwickreview:

This is a recap of last month’s short story month. For May, National Short Story Month, The Bushwick Review featured a short story (almost!) every day on this tumblr, all by living writers. The picture above is from an event at Mellow Pages Library, hosted by the nice folks from Pioneers Press. I read a couple of the short story posts from this tumblr and then after reading each selected post, I gave a book that had that short story in it away. It was fun!

Here were the stories for each day. The date links to the post and the story title/author links to the story itself, or where you can buy the writer’s book that contains that story. I ♥ short stories and the work of the writers below. 

MAY 31"Old Tampons" by Richard Chiem
MAY 30 —  "These Are the Fables" by Amelia Gray 
MAY 29 —  "Divorcer" by Gary Lutz
MAY 28 —  "Stone Animals" by Kelly Link
MAY 27 —  "Suicide Notes" by Scott McClanahan 
MAY 26 —  “Birds And Other Things We Placed In Our Hearts” by Timmy Reed
MAY 25 —  "Likeable" by Deb Olin Unferth  
MAY 24 —  "The Walk" by Lydia Davis 
MAY 23 —  "Amplifier Worship" by Matthew Bookin
MAY 22 —  "Face" by Ravi Mangla
MAY 21 —  "The Isle of Youth" by Laura van den Berg
MAY 20 —  “Why the Things You Use Every Day Might Kill You #11: The Spoked Wheel That Turns Paper through a Dot Matrix Printer” by Dolan Morgan
MAY 19 —  "Eastward" by Rebecca Nison 
MAY 18 —  no short story this day  
MAY 17 —  "Search" by LK Shaw 
MAY 16 —  "Vincent Peppers Explains A Conference Call" by Shane Jones
MAY 15 —  no short story this day
MAY 14 —  "The Smoker" by David Schickler 
MAY 13 —  "The Last American Woman" by Elizabeth Ellen
MAY 12 —  "Car Crash While Hitchhiking" by Denis Johnson 
MAY 11 —  "Violet" by Frederick Barthelme
MAY 10 —  "The Semplica-Girl Diaries" by George Saunders
MAY 9   —   "Something That Needs Nothing" by Miranda July 
MAY 8   —   "The Other Kind of Magic" by Juliet Escoria 
MAY 7   —   "We Close Our Eyes" by Adam Wilson
MAY 6   —   "Do Not Disturb" by A.M. Homes
MAY 5   —   "Screenwriter" by Charles D’Ambrosio
MAY 4   —   "Bees" by Sam Pink 
MAY 3   —  "In the Cemetery Where Al Jolson is Buried" by Amy Hempel
MAY 2   —  "Carry Me Home, Sisters of Saint Joseph" by Marie-Helene Bertino
MAY 1  —  "To the Interstate" by Rebecca Curtis

(via mbookin)

dopemove:

thenewephemera:

True.

I feel bad for the guy who had to figure this out the hard way. I’m sure he was standing by the elevator bank much the way we all do, wondering where he was going in life. He probably was frustrated for the elevator car that never comes to when he needs it. He was probably ready to stomp his feet and say “fuck it” and for the first time in his life take the goddamn stairs.

I bet the elevator door opened with a short ding and he was so upset by his decision to take the goddamn stairs for once he didn’t even notice the red arrow on the side of the doorway was pointing in the wrong direction. I bet he got on and didn’t even notice when he slapped the button on the wall there was no light illuminated at the center of the circle. He got on and for the first time in his life he went the wrong way and it was everything he ever needed.

I bet the elevator went down to the basement and he didn’t even notice until he was looking down a dark corridor. I probably recognized right away that he wasn’t in the right place. He wasn’t on his floor, a bright and well lit hallway. The mystery overwhelmed him, he felt the darkness pull him into the basement.

I can see him stepping off into the darkened space and the fear of a new frontier scared him enough to not spin around when the elevator door closed behind him enveloping him in the darkness of the basement. I can see him slowly walking towards a naked light bulb on the far side of the hallway, the only light in the basement casting deep shadows over everything. I can see him walking towards it with cautious trepidation, his breathing becoming loud the more he tries to stifle it.

He walks to the end of the hall and enters a small room. He walks into the center of the room, standing in the midst of shadows with an audience of nothing all around him. He slowly starts to feel the physical world slip away, there is nothing under the surface of the earth. He has become a prisoner of Hades, a pupil of Vucan, the impregnation of Gaia. The depths of the basement swallow him whole.

And with that he disappears into his own mind, forever.

This is an interview with a goat farmer.

For every story in THAT’S WHEN THE KNIVES COME DOWN, I’ll interview a person who has a related profession. I’ll ask a few questions about their work and a few questions connected to the themes of the story.

This interview is for the first piece in the collection, “Infestation.”

You can get the book here: aforementionedproductions.com/morgan-presale/

You can even get it with goats.

maihudson:

Facundo Pires, Recuento de Daños - Recount of Damages, 2013.
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maihudson:

Facundo Pires, Recuento de Daños - Recount of Damages, 2013.

+

Dolan Morgan’s THAT’S WHEN THE KNIVES COME DOWN

carissahalston:

image

I’ve spent many an hour making this book look slick, but really, I’m only doing it in hopes that it will be half as good as Dolan's writing.

We’re going to list the blurbs and cover art very soon. And following that, book trailers and pre-sale goodness.

Until then, accept my word: this book is a genuine thrill.

(via ap-apt)

Vagina attacks Mario.

Peculiar shoe store logo.

Illustration by Robin Mork for THAT’S WHEN THE KNIVES COME DOWN. Yay! Get it here: http://aforementionedproductions.com/morgan-presale/

Illustration by Robin Mork for THAT’S WHEN THE KNIVES COME DOWN. Yay! Get it here: http://aforementionedproductions.com/morgan-presale/

fer1972:

Today’s Classic: Arnold Böcklin (1827–1901) 
1. The plague (1898)
2. Diane being wathced by Tow Faunes(1877)
3. Isle of the Dead (1880)
4. War (1896)
5. Selfportrait (1873) fer1972:

Today’s Classic: Arnold Böcklin (1827–1901) 
1. The plague (1898)
2. Diane being wathced by Tow Faunes(1877)
3. Isle of the Dead (1880)
4. War (1896)
5. Selfportrait (1873) fer1972:

Today’s Classic: Arnold Böcklin (1827–1901) 
1. The plague (1898)
2. Diane being wathced by Tow Faunes(1877)
3. Isle of the Dead (1880)
4. War (1896)
5. Selfportrait (1873) fer1972:

Today’s Classic: Arnold Böcklin (1827–1901) 
1. The plague (1898)
2. Diane being wathced by Tow Faunes(1877)
3. Isle of the Dead (1880)
4. War (1896)
5. Selfportrait (1873) fer1972:

Today’s Classic: Arnold Böcklin (1827–1901) 
1. The plague (1898)
2. Diane being wathced by Tow Faunes(1877)
3. Isle of the Dead (1880)
4. War (1896)
5. Selfportrait (1873)

fer1972:

Today’s Classic: Arnold Böcklin (1827–1901) 

1. The plague (1898)

2. Diane being wathced by Tow Faunes(1877)

3. Isle of the Dead (1880)

4. War (1896)

5. Selfportrait (1873)

“A wall is a door too. It just doesn’t know it’s a door yet.”

The fighter of the party, before punching down his third wall that session. (via outofcontextdnd)

this goes out to my friend thenewephemera

(via hungryghoast)

(via hungryghoast)

Go take a look at something I am very excited to have participated in. http://www.mai-hudson.org