people say things about my book

“Between the moment you lose something and the moment you realize it has been lost is That’s When the Knives Come Down. In the spirit of Donald Barthelme, Dolan Morgan queers the every day and leaves a sinister domestic scene behind.”

— Catherine Lacey, author of No One Is Ever Missing

“The stories that comprise That’s When the Knives Come Down are unpredictable, wry, seductive, and breathtaking.  The mysteries here are not metaphors, and Dolan Morgan’s worlds are not created in the service of our humdrum one. These places shimmer, expand, contract, blur, and somehow remain whole all the while.”

— Nelly Reifler, author of Elect H. Mouse State Judge

That’s When the Knives Come Down is a series of broken parables, of roundabout answers to questions nobody asked, of dreams you can’t quite remember but felt so strongly about while you were having them. We are lucky to have these elusive things here, now, on paper, in front of us. Also, it’s funny.”

— Russ Woods, author of Wolf Doctors

“Dolan Morgan’s stories in That’s When the Knives Come Down are finely wrought puzzles of humor and grief and the absurd. Read them and feel fortified.”

— Manuel Gonzales, author of The Miniature Wife

“The multiple worlds Dolan Morgan creates sit atop a shifting, slippery, unpredictable darkness, one that means you’d better not get used to getting used to anything in these devilishly clever stories.”

— Amber Sparks, author of May We Shed These Human Bodies

“Dolan Morgan has the might of a unique voice, and there aren’t nearly as many of those as you’d think based on book blurbs. But believe this blurb. Those who do not will be dumber for it and not know why.”

— Robb Todd, author of Steal Me for Your Stories

That’s a real thing!

lareviewofbooks:

As the Super Bowl and Olympics near, Bigotry Flares

Friday, February 7th, the Sochi Olympics kick off under the watch of human rights advocates upset with the Putin administration’s homophobic policies. Five days prior the Seattle Seahawks face off against the Denver Broncos in…

Can hardly tell the difference between people and horses.

Titanic / Narcissus

More drawings, weee.

More drawings, weee.

more illustrating, wee

Another illustration for new (sort of secret) project. Weeee.

Illustration for new project. Woohoo.

Fun with new project, weeee.

venusofnatalie:

Here is the beautiful spread of The Atlas Review's third issue! The cover photo is by the very talented Traci Matlock. (Note: This is a screenshot from the work-in-progress, but I feel confident enough in the overall feel of it to share.) I feel incredibly strong about this issue. The content is phenomenal, and at 170+ pages, is certainly our fattest volume yet.

You ought to consider buying a copy of Issue 3, which is available for preorder (free of shipping). You ought to consider subscribing for a year, or even two years!

Issue 3 features poetry by CAConradNicole SteinbergMorgan Parker, Wendy Lotterman, Joanna C. Valente, Dan Encarnacion, Anthony Bartels, Sarah V. SchweigCraig Morgan TeicherJoshua Ware, Joe DeLuca, M. Callen, Ted Dodson, Jennifer Nelson, Marcus Slease, Tim Earley, Laressa Dickey, Josh Kalscheur, Krystal Languell, Liz Dosta, Jonathan Aprea, and Curtis Rogers; fiction by Nelly ReiflerJohn Jodzio, Valerie Cumming, Jesse Kohn, and Marlo Starr; nonfiction by Soleil Ho, Dale Megan Healey, and Sean H. Doyle; visual arts by Traci MatlockAliene de Souza Howell, Sarbani Ghosh, and Dan Ivec; and interviews with Etgar Keret and Sheila Heti.

I mean, come on! That’s really, really good. 

(via errantforms)

I never shut up.

DL There’s lot of debauchery, sex, alcohol, and excrement: the book explodes everywhere.  Why’s it so intense?

KILLO The first thing humans produce is crap.  Autobiography is a bit like saying ‘look at how beautiful my crap is’.  All this excrement is an expression of self-hatred.  You shit yourself, you purge yourself.  In comics, the panels system is also a system of retention and expulsion.  Comics also have a lot to do with childhood.  Crap interests me because as a child I often shit my pants.  Actually, it was because I refused to go and shit.  I held it all in.  Psychologists say children do that to make their parents understand that they’re in the shit.

—from here